Salary Negotiation Email

Sometimes it’s necessary to write a salary negotiation email to clarify your position and ask for higher salary. While we at SpringRaise recommend you do as much negotiation as possible in person, over the phone, through a recruiter, or even an HR rep from the company you’re interviewing with–an email can be a powerful way to justify your request for more money.

Key Salary Negotiation Steps

There are steps you must follow in salary negotiation that will better position you to get paid what you want and deserve.

  1. Know how your salary compares to others doing similar jobs.  This can be accomplished in several ways of which SpringRaise recommends a path in our salary negotiation guide, SpringRaise Your Salary.
  2. Understand what data you need to convince the company that you’re worth the money you want.  Certain pieces of data compel employers not only to consider your request for more money, but in good faith, to actually accept it.  [Our salary negotiation guide lays that all out for you.]

If you must write a salary negotiation email, it must achieve two goals:

1. Justify your request for higher salary

Justification of a higher salary request can be difficult because there are few external sources that a company will consider valid to justify your request. There are some great pieces of information that companies do use including salary surveys. These surveys are sold to companies so they can get a sense of what competitive salaries are at different levels. If you have that report, then you have equal ground.

2. Convey that you’re willing to walk away from the offer

Positioning in negotiation is key. The ultimate power in a salary negotiation is walking away. Companies spend thousands of dollars to get people in the seats to interview. When they like someone, they WANT that person. If you are that person and there’s a credible threat that you’ll walk away, companies tend to negotiate. Let me make this clear:

It is cheaper for them to increase your salary than it is for them to keep looking for candidates.
I have hired many people throughout the course of my career and this is generally accepted law, not theory. It’s a secret employers don’t want you to know! So have confidence and don’t be afraid to actually walk away if the salary isn’t right.

Note, and this is VERY important: Don’t try to justify your salary increase by using only salary calculators. That will offend the person with whom you’re trying to negotiate. Why? Because salary calculators are unreliable and companies believe they already offered you a competitive package.

Your justification must have more meat to it, including your current salary, and whether you would have to take a pay cut. If you have the salary information for someone at that company at your entry level, then using that would be beneficial. This is extremely important in winning your negotiation.

Also, your justification should also include something that will benefit the company AND your manager directly. Give the manager something to look forward to when hiring you at your negotiated salary.

FREE Sample Emails:  If you would like FREE sample salary negotiation emails, simply click here then fill out the form and we’ll get you your samples right away.

Note: Be sure to check your SPAM folder if you don’t receive your email within a few minutes after submitting the form.

3 thoughts on “Salary Negotiation Email”

  1. Hi, I am currently negotiating and they want to move fast. So I need to get my email drafted ASAP. Thank you so much for providing a valuable service to those of us not used to negotiating.

  2. Pingback: Salary Negotiation
  3. I want to change job. My present salary 4.80 lack per year.
    Please tell me how and how much i get salary.

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