Tag Archives: career

Are Infograhpics the New Resume?

I recently came across this question about infographics being the new resume as part of a media query and found it so intriguing, I had to weigh in.  Pam Baker writes about this subject on the Hewlett-Packard corporate blog and not only quotes us in the article, but also shows our infograhics to illustrate the power of supplementing your resume appropriately.  There were three main questions in the query:

  1. Is the traditional resume forever dead?
  2. Are infographics the best say to show future employers hard data?
  3. Will social media become our only or primary resumes?


One thing is abundantly clear: the traditional resume is NOT dead. In fact, it’s more alive than ever. Career infographics, however, are an incredible supplement that would never have been acceptable in previous eras. A career visualization can paint the picture of success that a traditional resume often lacks. As an example, here are two career visualizations that I use with my clients to illustrate how to represent their success: salary progress visualization http://springraise.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/my_raises2.png; job visualization shown below. Each of these visualizations works when needed and supplements a traditional resume job application.

Now to explicitly answer the questions:

1. Is the traditional resume forever dead? Not a chance. A solid resume that quantifies success at every point throughout a career still tells a story and will always be part of job submissions. The key to getting a job is finding the job that needs you instead of you needing a job.

2. Are infographics the best say to show future employers hard
data? The ol’ school resume is STILL the best way to quantify success. Infographics, while creative, have no standard and therefore there’s no guarantee the reader knows how to interpret the particular chart submitted. Never send an infographic alone as a resume submission. It will find the
recycle bin.

3. Will social media become our only or primary resumes? Social media could end up being our resumes, but the only platform that allows for this is LinkedIn, and it has one major limitation: you can only have one profile for your experience. I always recommend customizing resumes for an open position description because it maximizes the chance of getting an interview. Using LinkedIn (or, heaven forbid, Facebook Timeline) as a
stand-alone resume limits the opportunity for a candidate to customize the message and story. Plus it makes the recruiter work to find out who you
are as a candidate by requiring a click to a website rather than being able to review and sort immediately. Don’t make recruiters do extra work. They
don’t like it.

Check out our podcast on the subject as well!  Good luck.

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Mistakes That Can Send Your Resume into the Trash

SpringRaise is quoted in an article this week by Monster.com Career Column Senior Editor Charles Purdy describing ways your resume can turn off employers.

Check out the SpringRaise Get Paid Podcast (under 4 minutes) where I discuss three pet-peeves that drive me to trash a resume without so much as a glance.

Podcast:  3 Resume Pet Peeves (3:55)

Good advice here–especially #4.  From the article, Resume Mistakes: Four Things That Can Send Your Resume into the Trash | Monster:

4. Your Resume Is Sneaky

Kohut says she immediately distrusts people whose resumes have no dates on them. “Gaps are not a problem,” she says. “The problem is when you try to be deceptive.” 

David S. Williams, founder and CEO of salary consultancy SpringRaise, agrees, saying that if you are or have been unemployed, don’t try to hide it. “You may be doing yourself a disservice because you may be a strong candidate for a position, but you tried to hide your current status,” he says.

A better tactic is to be straightforward on your resume, and then use your cover letter to tell the story of your career’s progress — including information about how you maximized your time away from the 9-to-5 routine. And do remember to write a cover letter — not doing so is another guaranteed way to get your resume thrown into the trash, according to the experts.

Heed the advice, get a resume that gets you hired–and when you get that job offer, don’t forget to negotiate your salary!   When you present yourself correctly on paper, no matter what background you have, you’re always working for you.

 

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The Seven Factors That Influence Your Salary

To orient you with the way salaries are evaluated by employers, here are the seven factors–and some would be considered discrimination.  We hold nothing back here at SpringRaise.

1. Salary and Education. How educated you are matters in your salary.
2. Salary and Gender. Right or wrong, it has been documented that men often make more than women for the same job.
3. Salary and Weight. This would be considered discrimination by law, but your weight can influence how others perceive you and your value.
4. Salary and Years of Experience. How long you’ve been in the workforce and/or in your particular industry matters.
5. Salary Band. Where you are in your company’s salary band can influence your next raise amount.
6. Peer Salary. What your colleagues make can definitely influence how much you get paid. Knowing what they make is a big factor.

And  last, but most importantly…
7. Salary Negotiation. How well you negotiate at performance reviews or for new jobs can make a major impact on your lifetime earnings.

We at SpringRaise want you to know the seven salary influence factors so that you can manipulate them to your advantage.  Spend some time here and you’ll find a wealth of information that can help you make more money now and throughout your career.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Seven” and we’ll send them to you right away.

* denotes required field

Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

Subject

Social Media and Finding a Job – Recommendations by Platform

How important is social media in your job hunt?  What you don’t know *can* hurt you.  The founder and CEO of JobMagic gave a blog post on Mashable giving information on how social recruiting is changing the landscape of recruiting away from the “black hole” of resume submissions.

What Job Seekers Need to Know in Today’s Digital Market.

Where I depart from the recommendations in the article (as most are on point), is that you should cater all of your social networks to lean professional.  Good advice for job seekers?  Not really.  Why not?  Because interacting in social media is called “social” for a reason.  One should use the different networks to highlight different aspects of one’s personality (and keep all partying and drunk photos off all of them).  Recruiters will look at your twitter feed, Facebook and LinkedIn profiles — and even Google+, but give them something different to learn about you in each one.  Use the platform appropriately to highlight what you want the recruiter to see.

LinkedIn:  Keep it totally professional. If you have a blog, attach it to your profile so they can see how you discuss hot topics in your field.

Facebook:  Keep it classy.  Show that you have many friends and have interests outside of the industry work.  Remember, EVERY resume has an additional information section.  Make Facebook reflect those interests because it’s the best platform to play those up and not a great platform for career expression.

Twitter:  Keep it brief.  Focus on one main professional area, perhaps creating a public list for your industry interests for recruiters to follow.  Actively interacting with those on that list is a must.  Get as many people as you can to follow that list because it lends credibility that you know whom should be followed.  On your feed, everyone knows one can’t follow a huge number of people, so keep the number of people you follow manageable and believable.

Google +:  Keep it tech-y.  Until G+ has a more solid role and identity, there will be many ways to use it.  Find the right way to express yourself to your friends and subscribers using the new-ness of the platfrom.  At springraise, we find Google+ to be amazing at generating traffic to our blog as well as keeping people up to date on new industry-related findings (such as this post referring to the one on mashable).  In fact, we closed our Facebook account once Google+ launched. We’re just getting started with their brand pages.

Lastly, do something different, like visualize your career in a way that is unique to you.  That visualization can be posted on all of your social networks and be received well by recruiters and your friends.  That kind of creativity can also lead you to a better position in salary negotiation as the company will see how you think through complex challenges.

Check out my career visualization below.  What do you think?  Drop your thoughts in the comments.

IMG_0531

Salary

Happy New Year everyone!  As a major part of your total compensation, salary is the component that is what you get paid on your paycheck. There are many factors that influence your salary–some which are warranted, and others which may be a bit more controversial or subtle. At SpringRaise, we’re here to help you get the highest salary possible at every event throughout your career, whether it’s a raise, a promotion, changing jobs, or other opportunity to maximize your salary.

I’ve had many “springraises” throughout my career–raises in excess of 10% and even sometimes more than doubling my salary.  Check out the chart below to see my career compensation development.  After that, we’ll show you the seven factors that impact salary in your career.

Amazing!  I can show you how to get these types of raises throughout your career.

The Seven Factors That Influence Your Salary

To orient you with the way salaries are evaluated by employers, here are the seven factors–and some would be considered discrimination.  We hold nothing back here at SpringRaise.

1. Salary and Education. How educated you are matters in your salary.
2. Salary and Gender. Right or wrong, it has been documented that men often make more than women for the same job.
3. Salary and Weight. This would be considered discrimination by law, but your weight can influence how others perceive you and your value.
4. Salary and Years of Experience. How long you’ve been in the workforce and/or in your particular industry matters.
5. Salary Band. Where you are in your company’s salary band can influence your next raise amount.
6. Peer Salary. What your colleagues make can definitely influence how much you get paid. Knowing what they make is a big factor.

And  last, but most importantly…
7. Salary Negotiation. How well you negotiate at performance reviews or for new jobs can make a major impact on your lifetime earnings.

We at SpringRaise want you to know the seven salary influence factors so that you can manipulate them to your advantage.  Spend some time here and you’ll find a wealth of information that can help you make more money now and throughout your career.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Salary” and we’ll send them to you right away.

* denotes required field

Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

Subject

Use Your Facebook Timeline Profile for Your Career?

Would you do this?  Can’t see a good reason to use Facebook this way, but each person should manage his or her identity online, of course.  Let me know what you think in the comments.

Use Your Facebook Timeline Profile for Your Career – Forbes.

Don’t get me wrong.  Visualizing your career over time is pretty amazing.  SpringRaise is definitely in that camp (with some surprises upcoming), but using Facebook Timeline for that?

To show that we like the idea of visualizing your career, take a look at how I have mine in the pic below.  Approve?  In a nice twist of irony, show your appreciation:  ”Like” it on Facebook.

 

Is Career Success Measurable by Salary?

How can we measure our career success? What are our benchmarks? Obviously there are many ways to measure success, postulated here in a previous post. Each of us has to decide what success looks like, but if you want to understand if you’re on track to your career goal, how do you know?

There are two ways that I believe supersede any other:

  1. Mentors
  2. Knowing peer compensation

Mentors can tell you if you’re on the right track because they have been there, done that. They’re ahead of you and can help navigate the right career path. “Fool’s gold” will find its way to you throughout your career–jobs that look good at the time, but ultimately aren’t what you’re looking for and lead you astray from your goal. Mentors help you identify those instances, thus getting you to your goals faster. Getting great mentors is the trick, however. No one said it was easy.

The second is even harder. When you know your peer compensation, you have a sense of whether you’re achieving the financial rewards of your work. Sure you can judge that by what car you drive or the size of your house–but taking the long term view, those items will equalize. Your career is about maximizing compensation for the work that leads you where you want to go. Compensation should ascend commensurate with your experience and value. When that isn’t happening, you should know. Our salary negotiation guide, Get Paid* can show you how to figure out what you’re worth.

Measuring your career success is more art than science and takes some diligence. However, knowing your status will help you achieve your career goals while maximizing your compensation along the way. Best of luck!

For free salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below and we’ll send them to you right away.

* denotes required field

Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

Subject