Tag Archives: Discrimination

The Seven Factors That Influence Your Salary

To orient you with the way salaries are evaluated by employers, here are the seven factors–and some would be considered discrimination.  We hold nothing back here at SpringRaise.

1. Salary and Education. How educated you are matters in your salary.
2. Salary and Gender. Right or wrong, it has been documented that men often make more than women for the same job.
3. Salary and Weight. This would be considered discrimination by law, but your weight can influence how others perceive you and your value.
4. Salary and Years of Experience. How long you’ve been in the workforce and/or in your particular industry matters.
5. Salary Band. Where you are in your company’s salary band can influence your next raise amount.
6. Peer Salary. What your colleagues make can definitely influence how much you get paid. Knowing what they make is a big factor.

And  last, but most importantly…
7. Salary Negotiation. How well you negotiate at performance reviews or for new jobs can make a major impact on your lifetime earnings.

We at SpringRaise want you to know the seven salary influence factors so that you can manipulate them to your advantage.  Spend some time here and you’ll find a wealth of information that can help you make more money now and throughout your career.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Seven” and we’ll send them to you right away.

* denotes required field

Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

Subject

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Salary

Happy New Year everyone!  As a major part of your total compensation, salary is the component that is what you get paid on your paycheck. There are many factors that influence your salary–some which are warranted, and others which may be a bit more controversial or subtle. At SpringRaise, we’re here to help you get the highest salary possible at every event throughout your career, whether it’s a raise, a promotion, changing jobs, or other opportunity to maximize your salary.

I’ve had many “springraises” throughout my career–raises in excess of 10% and even sometimes more than doubling my salary.  Check out the chart below to see my career compensation development.  After that, we’ll show you the seven factors that impact salary in your career.

Amazing!  I can show you how to get these types of raises throughout your career.

The Seven Factors That Influence Your Salary

To orient you with the way salaries are evaluated by employers, here are the seven factors–and some would be considered discrimination.  We hold nothing back here at SpringRaise.

1. Salary and Education. How educated you are matters in your salary.
2. Salary and Gender. Right or wrong, it has been documented that men often make more than women for the same job.
3. Salary and Weight. This would be considered discrimination by law, but your weight can influence how others perceive you and your value.
4. Salary and Years of Experience. How long you’ve been in the workforce and/or in your particular industry matters.
5. Salary Band. Where you are in your company’s salary band can influence your next raise amount.
6. Peer Salary. What your colleagues make can definitely influence how much you get paid. Knowing what they make is a big factor.

And  last, but most importantly…
7. Salary Negotiation. How well you negotiate at performance reviews or for new jobs can make a major impact on your lifetime earnings.

We at SpringRaise want you to know the seven salary influence factors so that you can manipulate them to your advantage.  Spend some time here and you’ll find a wealth of information that can help you make more money now and throughout your career.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Salary” and we’ll send them to you right away.

* denotes required field

Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

Subject

Salary and Gender

Salary and gender go hand-in-hand. We all have heard of the statistics that women get paid less than men for the same job. An infographic from whitehouse.gov shows even more recent data.  That needs to change.

But to figure out where we are, we have to keep up on the research. There is a recent article in the Washington Post called “Salary, Gender, and the Social Cost of Haggling“. The point of the article is to enumerate how social dynamics dictate whether men and women should negotiate for raises and higher pay. So who’s better, men or women?

The answer is both. The goal in salary negotiation is often to maximize your compensation given your circumstances.

Men
What the academic researchers in the article suggest is that men often feel more comfortable asking for more money because they correctly believe that they won’t be penalized for doing so. That’s a cultural norm that leads to discrimination in overall compensation. Breaking that won’t be easy for any manager. Awareness is the key.

Women
Women, conversely, have the social recognition that their penalty for asking for more money is much higher than that of men. Therefore, they are maximizing their salaries often by NOT asking for more money. It’s this cultural norm that’s so troublesome. How can we both encourage women to negotiate while not penalizing them from the other side of the table? This double-edge leads to depressed salaries for women.

So what does all this mean to salary negotiation? I believe it indicates that when you can justify a higher starting salary or better raise, then you MUST try. On average, you will get more money (7.4% more according to the article). If you perform up to the value, then no one will think twice about paying your price. Asking for higher compensation without compelling justification can result in greater penalty because the perception of the hiring agent could be that you are driven first by greed rather than the goals of the company. Often companies see that as a red flag, man or woman. Prepare, prepare, prepare.