Tag Archives: Money

The SpringRaise Salary Negotiation Community

You need to make more money.  Now.  SpringRaise is ready to help you win your salary negotiation.  I can and will help you achieve an extraordinary raise–what we call a springraise–FREE.  I’m about to make you an offer you can’t refuse.  In essence, I’m going to pay you to join the world’s first and only salary negotiation community.  We’ll get to that in a minute.

Need proof I know what I’m doing?  Check out my career salary progression–I’ve averaged 16% annual salary increases over the years.

I haven’t just helped myself make more money.  I’ve helped my clients make an EXTRA $1 million in compensation over the last three years.  That’s $1 million MORE than what my clients were offered and doesn’t include how much was in their initial offer.  Let me help you win your salary negotiation.  I’m going to get you paid more than what you’re offered for FREE.  What do you have to do?  Join The SpringRaise Community.

The SpringRaise Network – We Pay YOU to Join

We’ve just launched the alpha release of the world’s first salary negotiation community.  But let me cut to the chase and tell you how WE PAY YOU to join:

You join the site and fill out your profile, we help you win your salary negotiation for FREE.

Like I said, we’re paying you to join and fill out your profile by getting you more money than you would have received through master negotiation advice from us.  I’ve never offered my consultation for free.  Take advantage.

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What is The SpringRaise Community?

The SpringRaise Salary Negotiation Community is the world’s first and only community dedicated to helping you negotiate your salary to make extraordinary raises (what we call “springraises”) either in your same company or when you join a new company.  We’re here to make you more money. Period.

What Do I Get for Joining The SpringRaise Community?

What do you get for joining SpringRaise?  Great question.  Check out all we have to offer NOW to our charter (alpha) members:

1.  Join The SpringRaise Community and we’ll give you our paid salary negotiation guides FREE when you fill out your profile.  These guides accomplish one thing: they show you the data you NEED so that employers can’t say no to your salary requests.  Get Paid* focuses on salary negotiation when joining a new company and Raise Up! focuses on negotiating raises at your current company.  We have sold hundreds of these guides and are offering them for free for the first time.

2.  Get FREE consultation time with experts from SpringRaise on how to win your salary negotiation.  We charge our clients thousands for this service and you will get time free when you fill out your profile.

3.  Joining is FREE for alpha members like you.  The SpringRaise Network may not always be free to join, but alpha members get lifetime free membership.  Join now and you will enjoy access to customized content, expert advice, and you’ll get paid so you can live a better life.

4.  You can anonymously invite others to join the alpha SpringRaise Community and their memberships will be FREE for life as well.  Invite the people whose salaries you want to compare to so you can see where you stand.  Invite colleagues you work with or your friends that you think could benefit from learning how to negotiate salary for higher raises.

This is what is at the heart of the SpringRaise vision-–placing YOU at the heart of your career and salary development, not employers. SpringRaise has come for you to maximize your salary over the course of your career, period.

Join Now!

Now you can see why SpringRaise has unlimited potential to help you negotiate salary throughout your career.  We’re just starting out and you can be part of that ascension while helping yourself win your current negotiation.  Join Now at http://alpha.springraise.com and you will instantly increase your ability to win.  We’re here for you.  Join Now!

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Employers More Willing To Negotiate Salary

In the past couple days there have been a lot of articles written about salary negotiation.  Why?  Because of a recent study that says 38% of employers are more willing to negotiate salary with candidates.  Last year’s number?  5%!

Time to Negotiate!

If that doesn’t tell you to get your negotiation plan together, then you need to wake up.  It’s time to make it happen and make yourself more money.  I know it can be scary, but isn’t it scarier to realize that you could have negotiated salary and didn’t?  No new apartment, no new car, no additional date money to go to the best restaurant.  The snowball gets larger and larger.

But Negotiate Wisely

You have to do it right.  Don’t leave something so important up to chance.  If you want to know how your employer can’t say no to your salary request, then check out our guide, Get Paid*.

If you would like FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “38%” and we’ll send them right away.

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The Seven Factors That Influence Your Salary

To orient you with the way salaries are evaluated by employers, here are the seven factors–and some would be considered discrimination.  We hold nothing back here at SpringRaise.

1. Salary and Education. How educated you are matters in your salary.
2. Salary and Gender. Right or wrong, it has been documented that men often make more than women for the same job.
3. Salary and Weight. This would be considered discrimination by law, but your weight can influence how others perceive you and your value.
4. Salary and Years of Experience. How long you’ve been in the workforce and/or in your particular industry matters.
5. Salary Band. Where you are in your company’s salary band can influence your next raise amount.
6. Peer Salary. What your colleagues make can definitely influence how much you get paid. Knowing what they make is a big factor.

And  last, but most importantly…
7. Salary Negotiation. How well you negotiate at performance reviews or for new jobs can make a major impact on your lifetime earnings.

We at SpringRaise want you to know the seven salary influence factors so that you can manipulate them to your advantage.  Spend some time here and you’ll find a wealth of information that can help you make more money now and throughout your career.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Seven” and we’ll send them to you right away.

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Salary

Happy New Year everyone!  As a major part of your total compensation, salary is the component that is what you get paid on your paycheck. There are many factors that influence your salary–some which are warranted, and others which may be a bit more controversial or subtle. At SpringRaise, we’re here to help you get the highest salary possible at every event throughout your career, whether it’s a raise, a promotion, changing jobs, or other opportunity to maximize your salary.

I’ve had many “springraises” throughout my career–raises in excess of 10% and even sometimes more than doubling my salary.  Check out the chart below to see my career compensation development.  After that, we’ll show you the seven factors that impact salary in your career.

Amazing!  I can show you how to get these types of raises throughout your career.

The Seven Factors That Influence Your Salary

To orient you with the way salaries are evaluated by employers, here are the seven factors–and some would be considered discrimination.  We hold nothing back here at SpringRaise.

1. Salary and Education. How educated you are matters in your salary.
2. Salary and Gender. Right or wrong, it has been documented that men often make more than women for the same job.
3. Salary and Weight. This would be considered discrimination by law, but your weight can influence how others perceive you and your value.
4. Salary and Years of Experience. How long you’ve been in the workforce and/or in your particular industry matters.
5. Salary Band. Where you are in your company’s salary band can influence your next raise amount.
6. Peer Salary. What your colleagues make can definitely influence how much you get paid. Knowing what they make is a big factor.

And  last, but most importantly…
7. Salary Negotiation. How well you negotiate at performance reviews or for new jobs can make a major impact on your lifetime earnings.

We at SpringRaise want you to know the seven salary influence factors so that you can manipulate them to your advantage.  Spend some time here and you’ll find a wealth of information that can help you make more money now and throughout your career.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Salary” and we’ll send them to you right away.

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Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

Subject

Do we have the right to negotiate for salary?

About a week ago I saw this question pop up on Yahoo Answers and thought I could answer it.

I got a job offer. They gave me the lowest range on the pay scale and said they can’t do anything about it. They didn’t give me the chance to negotiate. Is this fair?

I wasn’t the first to respond and the answers from those who did were shocking.

Of course it is fair. You have the option of declining the offer and find a job somewhere else.
Why you think life is fair should be addressed.

and this…

yep it’s fair, do you want the job or not? if you don’t there’s probably 100 others who would take the job today.

In their defense, of course it’s fair for an employer to imply that they don’t want to negotiate the offer.  But check out my response to see how I approached the situation with a slightly skewed perspective:

Salary is ALWAYS negotiable. How you negotiate, however, is in your hands. Sure, you can simply ask for more money but you’ll get the answer you got back. Here’s what you do:

If the offer is in writing already and doesn’t have an exploding date, just sit on it for a few days. When they call you because they haven’t heard from you, say you’re excited about the offer but you’re waiting for other offers to come in to compare. They don’t know whether you have other offers coming in or not but there’s a threat that they might lose you. What that will do is force them to set an exploding date for your offer because they don’t want to lose you and they want to pressure you to accept. This is fine, and really what you want.

From here you say that you’re excited about the opportunity, but times are tough and if you can get a higher offer you have to give yourself that option. They’ll likely understand that. Even if they’re hardcore about it and say something like “take it or leave it” you can then ask again for more money. Say something like “X amount will get me to YES and I will accept the offer today.” I’ve done this exact thing and it works. Just don’t be outrageous with the amount you’re asking in addition to what they offered. 5% – 7% is a good rule of thumb.

That is negotiating. There’s one golden rule in recruiting that employers don’t want you to know: It’s cheaper for them to hire you at a higher rate than they offered than it is for them to continue to look for candidates. You have that golden rule on your side. Good luck!

This (obviously) got the Best Answer rating from the questioner.  The moral of the story is don’t listen to people who are negative and say something can’t be done.  You can negotiate salary and sweeten your own offer without hurting your chance of getting the job.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Right” and we’ll send them to you right away.

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Top 5 Situations When You Should Ask For A Raise

I have a google alert for “ask for a raise” because many people are entering  the process of salary negotiation. In the past two weeks, I’ve had more than two dozen alerts hit my inbox. This is about double what I see for that particular alert over a similar time period. People need money, and they need it now.

It begs the question, when should someone ask for a raise? Is there ever a good time when it’s not part of the performance management cycle? How should you go about asking for the raise? These are valid questions and I have some rule of thumb answers that can help.

Question: When is a good time to ask for a raise (outside of the performance management cycle)?

Situation #1: Anytime you get significantly increased responsibility. If someone leaves your department and you have to pick up the slack, then you have an opportunity to ask for a raise. Do NOT ask for a raise right away, though. Show that you can do both jobs and then ask. You will have a better chance of getting the raise you want if you prove yourself.

Situation #2: Anytime you have an offer for another job whether it’s an internal move or to a new company. At that point you have leverage. If you’re good, they’ll want to keep you, so you can leverage the offer even if it’s even or only slightly higher than what you make now. It’s expensive to recruit and hire a replacement so it’s cheaper to give you your raise.

Situation #3: If you’re a performer and you haven’t had a raise in more than two review cycles. This situation is tenuous because you may not have received a raise because of poorer performance. If you know that you’re a strong performer (be honest with yourself), then you should have confidence in asking for a raise.

Situation #4: When your team wins a company award. These are the times to ask, but it’s usually a setup for your performance review. When the team wins an award, then you have recognition on your side. Your boss will be basking in getting the award, so it’s a good time to ask.

Situation #5: When you hear about someone in your same job making more money than you. This is a political play that often works, but not always. When you see peers doing your same job, but make more than you do and you’re a strong performer, you can justify asking for a raise.

If you follow these guidelines, then you have a much better chance of getting your raise. If you want to see how to best negotiate your salary and the information you need where they can’t say no to your request, then check out our Salary Negotiation Guide.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Top 5″ and we’ll send them to you right away.

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Top 4 Situations for Writing a Salary Negotiation Letter

Negotiating in person is always preferred, but there are a few situations when using a letter is more than appropriate.  The situations where a letter works are:

1.  When the manager asks for a letter

Sometimes managers ask you to write a letter of justification.  They may do that because they need information to work on your behalf and want you to make the justification and do the research.  This is always a good sign because it means the manager is listening and is more likely to represent your interests with his or her bosses.

2.  When a letter helps you to better articulate your position when a manager is unavailable or won’t make the time for a meeting

Managers often don’t want to deal with the negotiation so you take what’s offered.  A letter acts as an on-record request for more money and provides justification so you’re not ignored.  Sending the letter to multiple internal parties also can increase the pressure on your boss.  Of course, this tactic can backfire, but most of the time it’s good to get the ball rolling.

3.  When you are changing locales within a company or switching jobs that requires a move

This one is a no-brainer.  Put in writing what you want when there’s a relocation involved because they’re likely to give it to you.  Not only do they want you to move, but you’re putting your terms for accepting the new position in writing.  That’s never a bad idea.  The worst the power-that-be can say is no, but they run the risk of your not taking the job.

4.  When a company is creating a job for you

They’re creating a position for you…why not create a new salary for you?  Often companies who create a position have a salary range in mind, but if they’re creating it for you, then you should tell them in writing what compensation you expect.  Do your research on this one.  You can pretty much ask for the highest range of reasonable salary, but if you’re unreasonable, it will reflect on you and perhaps wave a red flag about your potential job performance.

Those situations call for a letter to accompany any negotiation, but the letter in these cases can serve as benchmarks for the overall negotiation and get the salary you deserve.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Top 4″ and we’ll send them to you right away.

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Over $900,000 in EXTRA salary springraises!

Yes, it’s true. SpringRaise customers have made more than $900,000 in extra compensation using our methods. We’re getting close to $1 million in extra salary! These salary increases will occur at every point in their careers whenever there’s a salary event because they know how to negotiate.

  • 100+ customers
  • $900,000.00+ in springraises

Isn’t it time for you to get the money you deserve? Get Paid.

Salary and Education

Clearly salary and education are related. You got to have an education in this world in order to demand a reasonable salary and guarantee that you maintain a certain standard of living. An undergraduate degree is a must and a masters or better is becoming more and more in demand for the highest paying jobs.

So what should you do? What degree should you pursue? Do I need a masters degree? These questions are key and can be answered looking inside and out. First inside, you have to know what you want to do . At least have an idea what intersests you so that you can try it out and get paid for it. If you don’t like it, at least you have the solid education to fall back on to try something else. That’s the luxury of having that bachelor’s degree.

The same goes for a masters or professional degree. Go for what you want and the money will follow. Some careers are more lucrative than others, but believe me, money doesn’t buy happiness. It does buy great vacations, so if you can bear having a miserable job for those 2-3 weeks of awesome vacation a year, then go for it.

Check out how my salary increased after getting my MBA from UCLA in the chart below.  I went from just under $50,000/year to $90,000/year.  And that’s after turning down an offer for $140,000/year (I’m still kicking myself for that one)!  Graduate degrees can pay off!

Looking outside, there are resources that can help you understand which careers are most suited for you and your goals. The first step is to have a goal. You’ll see that everywhere on this site. After that, it’s about analysis. Get your data together.

Salary Negotiation Tips

Let’s face it. We all want to get paid the highest amount possible for doing our jobs and salary negotiation tips are hard to come by. The jobs we do help our companies make a lot of money and without employees many of the great products wouldn’t come to market. How many of you feel like you’re adequately paid for the value you provide to your company? I didn’t think so. How then can you earn more money for doing what you’re doing?

1. Get in a hot industry

Easier said than done right? Well you know what the hot industries are , and if you don’t there are websites than can tell you. How do you get into that industry? We all have transferable skills. Map out your experience in what I call an “experience matrix.” Want a surefire way to know if you’re in a slow industry? Figure out if your raise was lower than the national rate of inflation. If you’re an above average employee and your raise was that low, then you’re in a slow industry.

2. Work smarter AND harder

When you work smarter at your job you become highly productive at doing what you have to do….but this frees up time…for pet projects that are risk free and may actually bring value. Doing things differently is what makes you stand out above your peers and bring more value to the company. Most companies actually do reward creativity and dedication.

3. Know your market value

Keeping an eye on what your peers make can let you know if you’re underpaid for your job. The best way to do this is to ask your peers (or use springraise.com, of course!). True, most managers don’t like their employees comparing salary notes, but that’s self serving. It’s a manager’s job to keep payroll as low as possible. It’s your job to get paid as much as possible, and knowing how much people make around you can help you. At my first job out of college after I’d been there a year, I learned that newly hired undergrads were getting paid more than I was-and that’s with the promotion I had just received! I used that knowledge to go to my manager to request more money. And I got it-a 16% raise.

These methods not only work separately, but also in combination. Think about if you’re in a hot industry, you’re outperforming your peers, and you know you could get paid more, then all of those things can work for you to get extraordinary salary increases. I was a management consultant in the mid 90s heyday and had worked smarter and harder than my peers. I also knew that I joined my company making slightly less than the average person at my level. Therefore, I got an 18% raise since I was seen as a top performer. Those kinds of raises only occur in hot industries where profits are strong and companies have to reward top talent in order to keep them happy and not look to jump ship.

To get those high raises, follow these tips, and combine them when possible. You’ll find your compensation will explode and you’ll attain all of your career goals.