Tag Archives: Salary

Are Infograhpics the New Resume?

I recently came across this question about infographics being the new resume as part of a media query and found it so intriguing, I had to weigh in.  Pam Baker writes about this subject on the Hewlett-Packard corporate blog and not only quotes us in the article, but also shows our infograhics to illustrate the power of supplementing your resume appropriately.  There were three main questions in the query:

  1. Is the traditional resume forever dead?
  2. Are infographics the best say to show future employers hard data?
  3. Will social media become our only or primary resumes?


One thing is abundantly clear: the traditional resume is NOT dead. In fact, it’s more alive than ever. Career infographics, however, are an incredible supplement that would never have been acceptable in previous eras. A career visualization can paint the picture of success that a traditional resume often lacks. As an example, here are two career visualizations that I use with my clients to illustrate how to represent their success: salary progress visualization http://springraise.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/my_raises2.png; job visualization shown below. Each of these visualizations works when needed and supplements a traditional resume job application.

Now to explicitly answer the questions:

1. Is the traditional resume forever dead? Not a chance. A solid resume that quantifies success at every point throughout a career still tells a story and will always be part of job submissions. The key to getting a job is finding the job that needs you instead of you needing a job.

2. Are infographics the best say to show future employers hard
data? The ol’ school resume is STILL the best way to quantify success. Infographics, while creative, have no standard and therefore there’s no guarantee the reader knows how to interpret the particular chart submitted. Never send an infographic alone as a resume submission. It will find the
recycle bin.

3. Will social media become our only or primary resumes? Social media could end up being our resumes, but the only platform that allows for this is LinkedIn, and it has one major limitation: you can only have one profile for your experience. I always recommend customizing resumes for an open position description because it maximizes the chance of getting an interview. Using LinkedIn (or, heaven forbid, Facebook Timeline) as a
stand-alone resume limits the opportunity for a candidate to customize the message and story. Plus it makes the recruiter work to find out who you
are as a candidate by requiring a click to a website rather than being able to review and sort immediately. Don’t make recruiters do extra work. They
don’t like it.

Check out our podcast on the subject as well!  Good luck.

Salary Negotiation Tips for Women – ABC News

Good advice for women from The Grindstone on ABC News Video (link below).  Not enough help with salary negotiation issues per my taste, but the key message comes through loud and clear:

Women, it’s imperative that you ask for higher raises and negotiate salary.  You don’t do it enough!

Salary Negotiation Tips with ABC News Video.

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Mistakes That Can Send Your Resume into the Trash

SpringRaise is quoted in an article this week by Monster.com Career Column Senior Editor Charles Purdy describing ways your resume can turn off employers.

Check out the SpringRaise Get Paid Podcast (under 4 minutes) where I discuss three pet-peeves that drive me to trash a resume without so much as a glance.

Podcast:  3 Resume Pet Peeves (3:55)

Good advice here–especially #4.  From the article, Resume Mistakes: Four Things That Can Send Your Resume into the Trash | Monster:

4. Your Resume Is Sneaky

Kohut says she immediately distrusts people whose resumes have no dates on them. “Gaps are not a problem,” she says. “The problem is when you try to be deceptive.” 

David S. Williams, founder and CEO of salary consultancy SpringRaise, agrees, saying that if you are or have been unemployed, don’t try to hide it. “You may be doing yourself a disservice because you may be a strong candidate for a position, but you tried to hide your current status,” he says.

A better tactic is to be straightforward on your resume, and then use your cover letter to tell the story of your career’s progress — including information about how you maximized your time away from the 9-to-5 routine. And do remember to write a cover letter — not doing so is another guaranteed way to get your resume thrown into the trash, according to the experts.

Heed the advice, get a resume that gets you hired–and when you get that job offer, don’t forget to negotiate your salary!   When you present yourself correctly on paper, no matter what background you have, you’re always working for you.

 

***If you want FREE Winning Resumes, just fill out the contact form below with the subject “Resumes” and we’ll send you the guide right away.

 

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Salary

Happy New Year everyone!  As a major part of your total compensation, salary is the component that is what you get paid on your paycheck. There are many factors that influence your salary–some which are warranted, and others which may be a bit more controversial or subtle. At SpringRaise, we’re here to help you get the highest salary possible at every event throughout your career, whether it’s a raise, a promotion, changing jobs, or other opportunity to maximize your salary.

I’ve had many “springraises” throughout my career–raises in excess of 10% and even sometimes more than doubling my salary.  Check out the chart below to see my career compensation development.  After that, we’ll show you the seven factors that impact salary in your career.

Amazing!  I can show you how to get these types of raises throughout your career.

The Seven Factors That Influence Your Salary

To orient you with the way salaries are evaluated by employers, here are the seven factors–and some would be considered discrimination.  We hold nothing back here at SpringRaise.

1. Salary and Education. How educated you are matters in your salary.
2. Salary and Gender. Right or wrong, it has been documented that men often make more than women for the same job.
3. Salary and Weight. This would be considered discrimination by law, but your weight can influence how others perceive you and your value.
4. Salary and Years of Experience. How long you’ve been in the workforce and/or in your particular industry matters.
5. Salary Band. Where you are in your company’s salary band can influence your next raise amount.
6. Peer Salary. What your colleagues make can definitely influence how much you get paid. Knowing what they make is a big factor.

And  last, but most importantly…
7. Salary Negotiation. How well you negotiate at performance reviews or for new jobs can make a major impact on your lifetime earnings.

We at SpringRaise want you to know the seven salary influence factors so that you can manipulate them to your advantage.  Spend some time here and you’ll find a wealth of information that can help you make more money now and throughout your career.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Salary” and we’ll send them to you right away.

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Salary and Years of Experience

You guessed it. Your salary and years of experience are also related. The more work experience you have (especially in your industry) the higher ascension your salary will take. Experience counts and companies are willing to pay for it.

Age and Experience

The older you get, the more money you make for the most part. When you hit 50, however, things start to change. You may be considered ‘expensive’ by the company you’ve been with for 25 years. Or you may realize that you’re working harder than you want to and want to switch careers. Things happen that can change your salary potential based on your work experience.

Salary Scenario Planning

It’s time for you to know those scenarios up front. Sure if you’re young, you have so many options, the world is open to you. But once you’re in your 40s and making serious money, then it’s time to start planning what to do after a while. We’re not being cynical as much as realistic. We all know people who have been forced into early retirement for financial reasons. It’s just good to stay on top of things.

If you’re young, it’s cool to see what others are doing with backgrounds like yours. What about people with a BS and and a JD? What types of jobs do they have and how much money have they made over time? Should I get my JD after engineering school? These are questions that can be answered through a few resources.  Good luck!  We’ll have some resources for you in the next few months.  Stay tuned….

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Years” and we’ll send them to you right away.

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Is Career Success Measurable by Salary?

How can we measure our career success? What are our benchmarks? Obviously there are many ways to measure success, postulated here in a previous post. Each of us has to decide what success looks like, but if you want to understand if you’re on track to your career goal, how do you know?

There are two ways that I believe supersede any other:

  1. Mentors
  2. Knowing peer compensation

Mentors can tell you if you’re on the right track because they have been there, done that. They’re ahead of you and can help navigate the right career path. “Fool’s gold” will find its way to you throughout your career–jobs that look good at the time, but ultimately aren’t what you’re looking for and lead you astray from your goal. Mentors help you identify those instances, thus getting you to your goals faster. Getting great mentors is the trick, however. No one said it was easy.

The second is even harder. When you know your peer compensation, you have a sense of whether you’re achieving the financial rewards of your work. Sure you can judge that by what car you drive or the size of your house–but taking the long term view, those items will equalize. Your career is about maximizing compensation for the work that leads you where you want to go. Compensation should ascend commensurate with your experience and value. When that isn’t happening, you should know. Our salary negotiation guide, Get Paid* can show you how to figure out what you’re worth.

Measuring your career success is more art than science and takes some diligence. However, knowing your status will help you achieve your career goals while maximizing your compensation along the way. Best of luck!

For free salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below and we’ll send them to you right away.

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Join a Startup? When To Keep Your Day Job

Here’s a favorite topic of mine….Many people ask me when should they leave their corporate jobs. I respond, “if you have to ask, then you need to stay.” Becoming an entrepreneur is incredibly rewarding, but you have to be ready. The pressure is immense, and the accountability stares you right in the face everyday.

There are two levels of readiness:

1. Commitment
2. Experience

Commitment is the utter will of wanting to be an entrepreneur, having a passion-driven mission that no one, not even your mother, can talk you out of. You know what you want. You know it will work. You know it HAS to be done. Bill Gates had that commitment. How many people do you know who would drop out of Harvard? That kind of motivation can overcome any lack in #2.

Experience counts for quite a bit. It builds confidence, a track record of success that you can always lean on in lean times. Knowing that you’ve been stretched beyond your limits and still succeeded makes the approach to entrepreneurship real. It’s not the kind of experience of telling others what to do without getting your hands dirty. It’s the kind of experience that comes with having to be accountable for results when you have no help. When the task is so daunting that you have absolutely no idea how you’ll complete it at the outset. But you come through. You know you can. You’ve done it before. That’s experience.

So when should you stay at your corporate job? When you don’t have the above two items. Some people believe in getting a job in an entrepreneurial organization to get exposure. If that’s your transition step, then fine, but it’s not necessary. You can get the experience you need at your corporate job.

When you have both experience and commitment, jump ship. Don’t wait. Don’t overthink it. You’ll save yourself the aggravation of regret later in life. Ask yourself this question: what’s the bigger risk, depending on yourself, or some dim-witted supervisor whose whim drives your day? Know when–then take that leap of faith. You’ll find, win or lose, it’s worth it.

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Maximizing Salary When Changing Jobs

OK, this is one of my secrets that I’m going to share with you. One thing everyone wants to know is how much of a jump in compensation should we get when we change jobs? There is a certain art to this, but there is a process that I use. My father told me when I was starting out that I shouldn’t change jobs unless the offer is 20% higher than my current compensation.

Salary Increase Benchmark
My father does deals for a living, so I’ve learned from a pretty good teacher about salary increases. In taking his lessons to heart, not accepting what someone tells me at face value, why take his word that 20% is enough? I didn’t. Over the course of my career, when I’ve changed jobs, my average increase in compensation is 30% and on average I’ve increased my salary 16% per year.

Confidence
Negotiating higher salaries is a function of communication, experience, and confidence. When we have our story straight and our minimum compensation threshold defined, there is no losing in the negotiation. If we are offered what we want, then great. Otherwise we walk. It’s simple.

What people tend to forget when looking for their next career move is that the company we just interviewed with spent thousands of dollars just to get us in that chair. That’s an investment they’re not keen to lose when they find a candidate they covet. That knowledge immediately swings negotiations in our favor. Have confidence and get the salary you deserve!

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Max” and we’ll send them to you right away.

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How to Ask For a Raise–When You Already Got One

Here’s another Yahoo Answers question that caught my eye and got me to divulge my thoughts.

I was recently promoted and kept my old pay rate for a while. I did not want to ask my boss for a raise until I was more adept at my new position. One day he gave me a 2$ per hour raise. The previous man before me was on salary and had less experience and less education than me. I was looking for about a 5$ per hour raise, which would keep me off salary and still make me much cheaper than the man I am replacing. I am now pretty good at what I do and I also help the older employees with most of their tech problems, saving a call to the expensive IT guy. How do I ask the boss for more pay since he already hit me with the preemptive raise?

Here was my response:

Having another offer is good, but not necessary. Having received a pre-emptive raise is good and shows that they recognize that you should have been paid more. To get to the $5/hour raise you want, however, you have to do some justifying. 1. Show how your projects have been as successful or more so than your predecessor. There’s a format you can use that I have in my free salary negotiation letters guide. 2. You should also know what the range is for wages at your position for both hourly and salaried positions if there are both. Know this before going in to the discussion w/ your manager or sending the letter asking for the raise. 3. You have to show what’s in it for the manager. How can the manager look good by actually paying you more? If you figure that out, then it will go a long way toward you getting what you want. Overall, you may not get the full $5/hour raise, but you might get another $1 or $1.50 on top of the $2 you already got. That’s a great negotiation outcome.

Let me know what you think.  In my experience, this is a great way to get more than the raise you received. Get FREE Salary Negotiation Letters! Fill out the form below.

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People Don’t Leave Jobs-They Leave Managers

We are in the midst of a recession, but there is still a lot of job changing. In certain in-demand positions like computer programmers, they leave because greener pastures literally mean more green. The money out there for computer programmers is obscene. Try hiring one and you’ll see what I mean. Yet I digress from the point–have you ever thought why people leave their jobs even when they’re paid well? Most of my mentors have told me that people rarely leave their company, they leave their managers. Therefore I’ve spent much of my career developing others, helping them to find their paths to success.

Developing others as a manager is helpful to both you and your employee because the better he/she is, the better you are. Your results will be better than they would otherwise be and you will see higher raises. You can also expect to pay the employees you develop more based on their productivity. That’s the best part about being a manager and negotiating salary with strong team members. They feel like you’re treating them fairly and you would be. Negotiations go smoothly.

The caveat to the above is when people have the information that they are underpaid versus their peers or someone with the same background. Armed with that information, people will seek the highest compensation for the same work, no matter what the perceived benefits are of staying at their current position. Once you lose that trust with your team that they’re paid commensurate with their achievements, then you can watch them walk right out the door. They’ll be leaving their manager AND their job.

To keep people, you have to develop them.

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