Tag Archives: Sample Letters

Employers More Willing To Negotiate Salary

In the past couple days there have been a lot of articles written about salary negotiation.  Why?  Because of a recent study that says 38% of employers are more willing to negotiate salary with candidates.  Last year’s number?  5%!

Time to Negotiate!

If that doesn’t tell you to get your negotiation plan together, then you need to wake up.  It’s time to make it happen and make yourself more money.  I know it can be scary, but isn’t it scarier to realize that you could have negotiated salary and didn’t?  No new apartment, no new car, no additional date money to go to the best restaurant.  The snowball gets larger and larger.

But Negotiate Wisely

You have to do it right.  Don’t leave something so important up to chance.  If you want to know how your employer can’t say no to your salary request, then check out our guide, Get Paid*.

If you would like FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “38%” and we’ll send them right away.

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Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

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The Seven Factors That Influence Your Salary

To orient you with the way salaries are evaluated by employers, here are the seven factors–and some would be considered discrimination.  We hold nothing back here at SpringRaise.

1. Salary and Education. How educated you are matters in your salary.
2. Salary and Gender. Right or wrong, it has been documented that men often make more than women for the same job.
3. Salary and Weight. This would be considered discrimination by law, but your weight can influence how others perceive you and your value.
4. Salary and Years of Experience. How long you’ve been in the workforce and/or in your particular industry matters.
5. Salary Band. Where you are in your company’s salary band can influence your next raise amount.
6. Peer Salary. What your colleagues make can definitely influence how much you get paid. Knowing what they make is a big factor.

And  last, but most importantly…
7. Salary Negotiation. How well you negotiate at performance reviews or for new jobs can make a major impact on your lifetime earnings.

We at SpringRaise want you to know the seven salary influence factors so that you can manipulate them to your advantage.  Spend some time here and you’ll find a wealth of information that can help you make more money now and throughout your career.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Seven” and we’ll send them to you right away.

* denotes required field

Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

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Salary

Happy New Year everyone!  As a major part of your total compensation, salary is the component that is what you get paid on your paycheck. There are many factors that influence your salary–some which are warranted, and others which may be a bit more controversial or subtle. At SpringRaise, we’re here to help you get the highest salary possible at every event throughout your career, whether it’s a raise, a promotion, changing jobs, or other opportunity to maximize your salary.

I’ve had many “springraises” throughout my career–raises in excess of 10% and even sometimes more than doubling my salary.  Check out the chart below to see my career compensation development.  After that, we’ll show you the seven factors that impact salary in your career.

Amazing!  I can show you how to get these types of raises throughout your career.

The Seven Factors That Influence Your Salary

To orient you with the way salaries are evaluated by employers, here are the seven factors–and some would be considered discrimination.  We hold nothing back here at SpringRaise.

1. Salary and Education. How educated you are matters in your salary.
2. Salary and Gender. Right or wrong, it has been documented that men often make more than women for the same job.
3. Salary and Weight. This would be considered discrimination by law, but your weight can influence how others perceive you and your value.
4. Salary and Years of Experience. How long you’ve been in the workforce and/or in your particular industry matters.
5. Salary Band. Where you are in your company’s salary band can influence your next raise amount.
6. Peer Salary. What your colleagues make can definitely influence how much you get paid. Knowing what they make is a big factor.

And  last, but most importantly…
7. Salary Negotiation. How well you negotiate at performance reviews or for new jobs can make a major impact on your lifetime earnings.

We at SpringRaise want you to know the seven salary influence factors so that you can manipulate them to your advantage.  Spend some time here and you’ll find a wealth of information that can help you make more money now and throughout your career.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Salary” and we’ll send them to you right away.

* denotes required field

Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

Subject

Salary and Years of Experience

You guessed it. Your salary and years of experience are also related. The more work experience you have (especially in your industry) the higher ascension your salary will take. Experience counts and companies are willing to pay for it.

Age and Experience

The older you get, the more money you make for the most part. When you hit 50, however, things start to change. You may be considered ‘expensive’ by the company you’ve been with for 25 years. Or you may realize that you’re working harder than you want to and want to switch careers. Things happen that can change your salary potential based on your work experience.

Salary Scenario Planning

It’s time for you to know those scenarios up front. Sure if you’re young, you have so many options, the world is open to you. But once you’re in your 40s and making serious money, then it’s time to start planning what to do after a while. We’re not being cynical as much as realistic. We all know people who have been forced into early retirement for financial reasons. It’s just good to stay on top of things.

If you’re young, it’s cool to see what others are doing with backgrounds like yours. What about people with a BS and and a JD? What types of jobs do they have and how much money have they made over time? Should I get my JD after engineering school? These are questions that can be answered through a few resources.  Good luck!  We’ll have some resources for you in the next few months.  Stay tuned….

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “Years” and we’ll send them to you right away.

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Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

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New Job Salary Negotiation Isn’t Scary!

In today’s economy, people looking for jobs are at the point where every cent counts. When engaging in new job salary negotiation, you MUST keep a couple things in mind:

1. You might be working for the person you’re interviewing/negotiating with

The last thing your new “boss” is going to want is to feel burned by you in a salary negotiation. The key to appropriately winning a new job salary negotiation is to make it seem like a win-win for both your new company and for you. Whether it’s your educational background, work experience, or network, each of these can be used to make your new manager look good. Offer that up in your negotiation and you’ll find you’ve created an ally rather than an adversary.

2. The only insight they have into your success at previous jobs is what you tell them, so make it GREAT

You are GREAT! So let everyone know it. You don’t have to embellish your experience to be the exact person that a company needs. Just match your background with their job needs AND preferences. Communicate your greatness through your cover letter, resume, interview, and negotiation by staying on your story. Know what you want to say backwards and forwards so that nothing is off message. Once you have done that, you’ve ensured that you’ll be in a strong negotiating position.

For FREE sample salary negotiation letters, just fill out the form below with the subject “New Job” and we’ll send them to you right away.

* denotes required field

Your Name*

Your Email*

Your Situation*

Your Geography*

Your Salary + Bonus* (separate salary and bonus)

Subject